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The Foundation

Oral Histories

Oral Histories Program

Oral history projects offer a great way to "do good" while raising the stature of the profession to the general public. Currently, the cumulative number of transcriptions completed by our court reporters and students for the Library of Congress (LOC) and other program partners has reached over 3,400.  To recognize NCRF/NCRA's 10-year partnership with the Veterans History Project (VHP) at the LOC, in 2013, we implemented a new initiative, "Make the Promise". 

We are asking you, through "Make the Promise", to increase the number of comleted transcriptions to 3,500 by Veterans Day, 2014.  That's roughly 100 new transcriptions made from the oral history collections of any of our three program partners.  We have been told countless times what a wonderful experience it is to transcribe an oral history and to be part of the making of a lasting legacy.  Won't you please help us to reach our goal by making a promise to participate?

     Sign-up Sheet for Professional Reporters & Students

Professional court reporters will earn 0.25 Professional Development Credit (PDC) for each transcription completed and can earn up to a maximum of 1.0 PDC during their three-year certification period. Additionally, students have an opportunity to earn a complimentary 2015 student membership in NCRA through the Student Initiatives Program. (See below)

 

The Library of Congress Veterans History Project (VHP) 

VHP is the first of several oral history projects being supported by NCRF and NCRA members through NCRF's expanded Oral Histories Program.  Since 2003, NCRA members, who volunteer their services, have worked with NCRF and the Library of Congress to record and transcribe the moving stories of many U.S. war veterans, building a lasting legacy of the diverse group of men and women who have served our nation during wartime.

The VHP program was expanded in 2007 through the 1,000 Voices Initiative, which took the project to the public asking them to interview any veteran they might know.  Many veterans have never made any formal record of their wartime experiences, but are willing to sit down and talk with someone who will listen. This initiative continues to play an important role in preserving veterans stories.  

By interviewing and recording a veterans' oral history, you can contribute to this lasting legacy. Contact Irene Cahill or complete the sign-up form for access to a veteran's history.

 

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM)

The National Court Reporters Foundation (NCRF) is very pleased to announce our agreement with the U. S. Holocaust Memorial Museum (the Museum) in Washington, D. C., to have court reporters transcribe the histories of Holocaust survivors. The Museum currently has a registry of over 200,000 records related to survivors and their families from around the world, and NCRF is honored to be able to provide assistance in transcribing them for posterity and public research.

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum was dedicated in 1993, as a living memorial to the Holocaust. The Museum inspires citizens and leaders worldwide to confront hatred, prevent genocide, and promote human dignity. Its far-reaching educational programs and global impact are made possible by generous donors.

The Museum has welcomed more than 36 million visitors, including 96 heads of state and more than ten million school-age children. Their website, US Holocaust Memorial Museum, the world’s leading online authority on the Holocaust, is available in 15 languages and, in 2013, was visited by more than 12 million people representing 226 countries and territories.

Their collection includes over 14,000 stories, and the Museum is identifying those that are 90 minutes or less. Certified court reporters will receive 0.25 PDC for each transcription, up to a maximum of 1.0 PDC in their certification cycle. If you are interested in transcribing these moving stories, contact Irene Cahill, director of research and NCRF programs.

Click here for the Museum's transcript guidelines: USHMM Guidelines


The Center for Public Policy & Social Research (CPPSR) at Central Connecticut State University.

CPPSR is another NCRF partner in the Oral Histories Program. They have been involved with the Library of Congress and VHP since 2004, and have completed more than 200 veterans' interviews. We have agreed to assist them in transcribing their collection. CPPSR is engaged in improving the quality of public policy, public service, University outreach, community engagement and applied research in Connecticut.

The Legal Aid Oral History Project

Program partner, The National Equal Justice Library (NEJL) at Georgetown University, is the only national institution dedicated to preserving the legal profession's history of serving poor Americans who are in need of legal representation. The NEJL has a very popular collection of oral histories provided by legal aid lawyers, administrators, and educators which captures their individual experiences representing the poor in legal matters. This material, in part, tracks an important part of President LBJ's War on Poverty Initiative.

 

NCRF is also assisting the Missouri Veterans History Project in assuring that the transcriptions of Missouri wartime veterans' oral histories are made a part of the VHP at the Library of Congress.

 

Student Initiatives Program

In 2008, the Student Initiatives Program was created as a means to focus on student participation in the newly formed Oral Histories Program. This program has become quite popular, and will be continued into the 2015 NCRA membership year. NCRF will fund 2015 NCRA student memberships for qualifying students who transcribe two oral histories from any of our partner organizations. This is a win-win situation as important historical work is being done for our Oral History Program partners, and students are inspired to get involved with their court reporting community.

Get involved in NCRF's Oral Histories Program today.  It's a chance to make history permanent - one story at a time.

 

For more information on the Oral Histories Program, please email Oral Histories.

 

 

 

 

 

Updated 10/16/2014